Currently viewing the tag: "CAREER DEVELOPMENT"

A major challenge many organizations face is the loss of knowledge and intellectual capital as older employees leave the workforce. In 2012 SHRM and AARP conducted a survey. The results indicated that 72% of HR professionals reported that their organizations saw the loss of older workers and their knowledge as a potential problem. Yet, only 5% of those companies had implemented policies and strategies to address this anticipated loss of talent and knowledge.

How can companies create a positive work environment and employment policies that attract and retain valued senior talent?

On Thursday, July 11, 2013 from 7:30 AM to 9:30 AM, co-facilitators Tom Morris and Dee Cascio will conduct a dynamic, interactive session on The Graying of America II – Talent Acquisition and Retention which will be sponsored by the Dulles SHRM Chapter Discussion Group. This meeting is free for members and interested colleagues. For more information or to register, contact Wistaria Krigger at 703-716-1191, email discussion@dullesshrm.org or visit http://www.dullesshrm.org/discuss.asp. Registration is required no later than 24 hours in advance to ensure sufficient seating for all attendees.

The July 11 discussion will focus on:
• Why older workers are essential in our labor force.
• Ways to better recruit and retain experienced workers.
• Knowledge transfer/succession planning as both a personal (career management) and corporate (talent management) responsibility.

ABOUT THE GRAYING OF AMERICA II – TALENT ACQUISITION AND RETENTION DISCUSSION FACILITATORS:

Thomas W. Morris III, CMF, Founder and President of Morris Associates Inc., has helped thousands of people navigate to new employment faster and more effectively. He is certified internationally as a Career Management Fellow. A published author, Tom is often quoted in local and national publications and has been interviewed on radio and television stations in the United States and Canada. Tom has held leadership positions with numerous professional and volunteer organizations including four years as Co-Chair of Job Connection, a job fair for people with disabilities and five years as Chairman of the Board of The Emeritus Foundation, a non-profit organization that paired retired and semi-retired professional volunteers (lawyers, accountants, social workers, scientists, mathematicians, engineers) with local schools and community organizations. Tom’s keynote presentation, Marketing Yourself After 50: Good News for Gray Hairs has been heard by thousands of employees considering ongoing employment after the legal retirement age.

Dee Cascio, LPC, LMFT, ACC, BCC received her M. S. Degree in Counseling in 1970 from the University of Scranton and entered the field of education as a teacher and then a secondary school counselor. She was licensed in Virginia as a psychotherapist in 1986. She has owned her own business since 1986 and works with individuals, couples, and groups to achieve healthier and more satisfying lives through all stages of life and as they transition to retirement. Dee is a private practice licensed psychotherapist who successfully re-careered to coaching as both a Certified Life Coach and a Certified Retirement and Re-Career Coach. She and her husband enjoy encore careers that give them the freedom to travel. She believes any creative lifestyle is possible if you plan well and are receptive to change and adventure. Dee writes a monthly Retirement Lifestyle Strategies newsletter and is a contributing author to Contagious Optimism (release-June 2013). She is also writing her own book on Retirement Lifestyle Planning. She makes presentations about lifestyle planning to businesses, financial planners, professional groups, church/civic associations. She is also a member of Rotary International and Dulles Chamber of Commerce.

It’s that time of year – and we’ve had more requests than ever before to again revisit why December may be the best time to conduct a job search.

Perhaps your thinking: Now? No sense looking now; everybody knows that no one hires in December.

Contrary to widespread belief, December can actually be one of the best months to conduct a job search. Here’s five reasons why:

1. Less Competition: Since so many people believe December is a bad month to look for a job, they don’t actively search during that month. Hence, there is less competition from other job seekers, and potential employers have more time to consider those who do apply for positions.

2. More Access: “Everybody” does not go away for the December holidays. On the contrary, many managers are both catching up on unfinished business and are getting ready for the new year. Many human resources directors are working on staffing plans for the coming year, and are more attentive to personnel matters than they usually are. Thus the last month of the year can be the best month of all to get access to key people.

3. The Giving Season: As people get in the spirit of the year-end holidays, they tend to be more disposed toward helping others. There may not be a huge swing in this direction, but even a little increased openness by hiring managers works in favor of applicants.

4. January Hires: January is often one of the biggest months of the year for hiring. However, individuals who are hired in January usually are not the people who waited until then to start their job searches. Those hired in January are often people who were actively pursuing leads in December. (We’ve worked with job applicants who had critical interviews on Christmas Eve or during the last week of the year.)

5. The January Rush: A lot of people make New Year’s resolutions to change jobs. In January, therefore, the market becomes more saturated with job seekers. If you put off your search until after the December holidays, you’re likely to have to compete with a bigger (and possibly more determined) crowd in January. You also risk losing psychological job-search momentum around Thanksgiving, and you may not get into high gear until mid-or-late January. That means, obviously, that a job seeker can actually lose two months, not just one, by suspending activity in December.

Did you know that between 2000 and 2010, the number of 55 to 64 year-olds in the workplace, increased by more than 50%? At the same time, the number of people 35 to 44 in the workplace decreased by about 10%. An enormous difference.

None of us is as old as we thought we’d be when we got to the age we are now. Overall mental and physical health, vitality… We’re able to stay productive and active in our lives and in the workforce longer.

There’s more good news! Click here to watch an 11 minute video of Tom presenting Good News for Gray Hairs: Marketing Yourself After 50.